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* Entrance Fee of RM20 is chargeable to first time applicants for all membership categories except for student membership.

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Abstract Methods Manipulation of Benzyl Acetate and Jasmone Content of Jasminum sambac L. Using Modified Murashige and Skoog Medium on Callus Explant

As. Pac. J. Mol. Biol. & Biotech., Jan 2015 Vol. 1, 20-23

Methods : Manipulation of Benzyl Acetate and Jasmone Content of Jasminum sambac L. Using Modified Murashige and Skoog Medium on Callus Explant

Dwie Retna Suryaningsih*, Sri Arijanti Prakoeswa and Ribkahwati

Faculty of Agriculture, University of Wijaya Kusuma Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia.

* Author for correspondence: Ribkahwati Tanowidjaya
Faculty of Agriculture, University of Wijaya Kusuma Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia.
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Abstract.

Jasmine (Jasminum sambac L.) is a flowering plant that grows in shrub form. Jasmine flowers have been extensively used as ornamental and for the production of fragrances, flowers, tea and essential oils. The amount of essential oil that can be collected from jasmine petals is very small relative to the material required, but it is valued as the raw material for natural perfume and aromatherapy treatments. This study attempted to improve propagation from explant to manipulate essential jasmine oil production. Modified Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium, produced from carbohydrate precursor compounds (MS + 20 % fructose, MS + 20 % glucose and MS + 20 % sucrose), was used to produce explants from young leaves and calluses. Essential oil (benzyl acetate and jasmine) content was highest in jasmine explant calluses grown on MS + 20 % sucrose. The content of benzyl acetate reached 1.27 % and jasmone content reached 1.15 % in 12 weeks old calluses.

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Abstract Isolation of Growth Hormone (GH) gene from Malaysian mahseer, Tor tambroides

As. Pac. J. Mol. Biol. & Biotech., Jan 2015 Vol. 1, 20-23

Isolation of Growth Hormone (GH) gene from Malaysian mahseer, Tor tambroides

Nor Haini Abd Rashid1, Shahreza Md Sheriff1, 2, Muhd Danish Daniel Abdullah1, Nur Asma Ariffin1, Tun Nurul Aimi Mat Jaafar1 and Abol Munafi Ambok Bolong1

1School of Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, 21300 Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu
2Institute of Tropical Aquaculture (AQUATROP), Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, 21300 Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu.


* Author for correspondence: Shahreza Md. Sheriff
Institute of Tropical Aquaculture, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, 21300 Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia.
Tel.: 0192867794, Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Abstract.

A study was done to clone a cDNA of the Malaysian mahseer (Tor tambroides) growth hormone (GH) gene. In this study, an RT-PCR technique was used to isolate the GH gene using RNA extracted from brain tissue of T. tambroides. The fragment obtained was purified and cloned into pGEM-T easy cloning vector. The GH cDNA of T. tambroides consists of 1,189 nucleotides (nt) excluding the poly (A) tail, with a 36 nt untranslated region (UTR) at the 5’ region and a 520 nt UTR at the 3’ region. The GH cDNA contains an ORF of 633 nt and encodes for a polypeptide of 210 amino acids (aa), including a signal peptide of 22 aa. Comparison of the T. tambroides GH gene with other teleost GH genes indicated that it has the highest similarity with C. carpio GH type 1 (GHI) with which it shares 99% and 98% homology in terms of amino acid and nucleotide sequences, respectively. Molecular characterization of the T. tambroides GH gene showed it exhibits typical GH features similar with other teleost GH genes. Therefore, the GH sequence of T. tambroides was successfully isolated and the sequence added to the database GenBank (JF428142). This is the first report of the isolation of a GH gene from this Malaysian indigenous species, and will assist in understanding the molecular characteristics of the T. tambroides GH gene. This could lead to the use of molecular approaches to better understanding the growth of T. tambroides and give an insight into the molecular aspects of its growth performance in aquaculture. 

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Abstract Growth of Moraxella osloensis COK1, a Novel Strain of Bacteria Isolated from Subbituminous Coal, in Dibenzothiophene and Coal Medium

As. Pac. J. Mol. Biol. & Biotech., Apr 2015 Vol. 2, 48-58

Growth of Moraxella osloensis COK1, a Novel Strain of Bacteria Isolated from Subbituminous Coal, in Dibenzothiophene and Coal Medium

Megga Ratnasari Pikoli1*, Pingkan Aditiawati2, Dea Indriati Astuti2 and Akhmaloka3

1Department of Biology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universitas Islam Negeri (UIN) Syarif Hidayatullah Jakarta, Jl. Ir. H. Juanda 95, Ciputat, Tangerang, Banten 15412, Indonesia
2Microbial Biotechnology Research Group, School of Life Science and Technology, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung,Jawa Barat 40132, Indonesia
3Biochemistry Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung, Jawa Barat 40132, Indonesia.


* Author for correspondence: Megga Ratnasari Pikoli
Department of Biology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universitas Islam Negeri (UIN) Syarif Hidayatullah Jakarta, Jl. Ir. H. Juanda 95, Ciputat, Tangerang, Banten 15412, Indonesia.
Tel.: +62217401925, Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Abstract.

Bacteria capable of desulfurization of organic substances in coal and petroleum are required to improve the quality of the fuel. We have thus isolated bacteria from coal sources and examined their growth and desulfurization activities in monocultures. Three viable strains of bacteria were obtained using two procedures: one-step enrichment and gradual enrichment. A medium was used which was enriched with dibenzothiophene, the most dominant organic sulfur in coal. Based on analysis of 16S rRNA gene, it was found that the bacteria were closely related to Moraxella osloensis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enhydrobacter aerosaccus. The evolutionary relationships amongst these bacteria were analyzed by phylogenetic inference and a phylogenetic tree constructed. The growth of the viable bacteria were observed independently in medium containing dibenzothiophene and coal. Moraxella osloensis has not been previously reported as a bacteria associated with coal, or in using organic sulfur in coal. However this study demonstrated that the most suitable medium for growth was a coal medium, indicating that the isolates may potentially be developed as a monoculture for coal desulfurization. The other two isolates showed unsteady growth, and further study is needed to enable their growth in mixed culture and to meet the requisites of their natural interactions.

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Abstract Isolation and characterization of a biodegrading 3-chloropropionic acid Burkholderia cepacia WH1 isolated from abandoned agricultural land

As. Pac. J. Mol. Biol. & Biotech., Apr 2015 Vol. 2, 36-47

Isolation and characterization of a biodegrading 3-chloropropionic acid Burkholderia cepacia WH1 isolated from abandoned agricultural land

Wafaa Hassan Muslem1, 3, Fahrul Huyop3*, Iffah Izzati Zakaria4, Roswanira Abdul Wahab2*

1Department of Biology, College of Science, Al-Mustansiriyah University, Iraq
2Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Malaysia
3Department of Biotechnology and Medical Engineering, Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Malaysia
4Iffah Izzati Zakaria, Natural Products and Drug Discovery Center, Malaysian Institute of Pharmaceuticals and Nutraceuticals, National Institutes of Biotechnology Malaysia, Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation, Block 5-A, Halaman Bukit Gambir, 11700 Pulau Pinang, Malaysia.


* Author for correspondence: Roswanira Abdul Wahab
Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Johor, Malaysia.
Tel.: +607 5534148, Fax: +607 5566162, Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

and

Fahrul Huyop
Department of Biosience, Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Malaysia.
Tel.: +607 5534163, Fax: +607 5566162, Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Abstract.

The widespread use of herbicides that may contain the recalcitrant halogenated compound 3-chloropropionic acid poses significant environmental hazards and may prove detrimental to human kind. Therefore, it is important that an environmentally friendly bio-based method to detoxify such substance is developed. Consequently, the research detailed here investigated the isolation and identification of a bacterial strain that could degrade 3-chloropropionic acid (3-CP) as its sole carbon source. A dehalogenase producing bacteria capable of utilizing 3-CP was successfully isolated from abandoned agricultural land and designated strain WH1. Analysis of 16s rRNA as well as biochemical and morphological tests found that the strain WH1 showed a 96% sequence identity with and characteristics similar to that of Burkholderia cepacia. Analysis of phylogeny and BIOLOG confirmed that the strain WH1 was indeed B. cepacia. The bacteria grew well at 37°C in media containing 10 mM 3‒CP but exhibited a rather slow doubling time of 43.62 h, with an optimum chloride ion release of 0.194 µmol Cl−/mL. Most importantly, analysis by high perfomance chromatography revealed that the B. cepacia isolate effectively degraded ~100% of available 10 mM 3CP. This is the first report detailing a B. cepacia strain able to competently utilize 3-CP as its sole carbon source.

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Abstract Comparison of levels of chloroplast DNA diversity of two Shorea species with contrasting geographical distribution

As. Pac. J. Mol. Biol. & Biotech., Apr 2015 Vol. 2, 59-70

Comparison of levels of chloroplast DNA diversity of two Shorea species with contrasting geographical distribution

Zulfahmi1*, Utari Ocsewonda Mahfira2, Ulfah Juniarti Siregar3, Iskandar Zulkarnaen Siregar3, Tedy Yunanto4

1Department of Agrotechnology, Faculty of Agriculture and Animal Science, State Islamic University of Sultan Syarif Kasim, Panam, Pekanbaru 28293, Riau, Indonesia
2Alumni of Department of Silviculture, Faculty of Forestry, Bogor Agricultural University, Kampus IPB Darmaga, Bogor 1668, Indonesia
3Department of Silviculture, Faculty of Forestry, Bogor Agricultural University, Kampus IPB Darmaga, Bogor 1668, Indonesia
4Directorate General of Mineral, Coal and Geothermal, Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Jakarta, 12870 Indonesia.


* Author for correspondence: Zulfahmi
Department of Agrotechnology, Faculty of Agriculture and Animal Science, State Islamic University of Sultan Syarif Kasim, Panam, Pekanbaru 28293, Riau, Indonesia.
Tel.: +62-761-562051, Fax: +62-761-562052, Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Abstract.

The analysis of the distribution of genetic diversity in a species provides useful information for conservation programs and management at the species level. The objective of this study was to observe the distribution of chloroplast DNA haplotypes and to assess their variation within and among populations of two Shorea species. Results of this study showed that each of the two species was characterized by a different common haplotype. Polymorphisms were found in each species, but the overall haplotype variation was low due to the low number of cpSSR markers investigated. A low level of intra-specific variation was detected in natural populations of S. parvifolia and S. laevis in which only three haplotypes and four haplotypes were found, respectively. A strong differentiation among populations of S. parvifolia and S. laevis were observed (GST = 0.582 and GST = 0.736, respectively), indicating limited gene flow among populations of two Shorea species. Despite its restricted distribution, S. laevis exhibited higher genetic diversity than the more widespread S. parvifolia. It is clear that the expectation of reduced genetic diversity in species with restricted distribution is not always borne out. Geographical distribution of haplotypes did not clearly reflect the distribution of two Shorea species populations. The findings of this study could be utilized as basic information to conserve the sources of genetic diversity in S. parvifolia and S. laevis in the future.

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